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Posts Tagged ‘gooseberries’

Here’s a quick run-down of what’s growing in my garden right now. I’m doing this largely to keep a record, for next year, of what comes around when; perhaps it will also be of some use to others gardening in high and dry places around 5000+ feet, wherever you are. If you live at high altitude, drop a comment and tell me what you’re getting out of your garden in mid-July!

Ready for the eating:

Rainbow chard

Collard greens

a few last heads of Romaine

Zucchini – still enjoying them grilled with olive oil and Penzey’s special seasoned salt; eventually I expect we’ll tire of that and start looking for other ideas, but for now I can’t keep them on the plate.

A mystery hybrid squash that volunteered in last year’s old squash bed; it’s producing small yellow rounded fruit, kind of like a patty-pan crossed with a yellow crookneck (could be exactly that, but who knows? I’ll try to eat one and see what it does…)

Red onions – I just yanked the whole batch and used them in the chard and onion quiche I made last weekend; had I not done so I’d still have several good ones.

Sorrel

Parsley, basil, tarragon, thyme, oregano, lots of mint, sage, chives

ripening: currants, gooseberries, apples!

On the vine, looking pretty green: lots of heirloom tomatoes and cherry tomatoes of all shapes and sizes. I’m expecting cherry tomatoes to overwhelm us soon: we have black cherry, Sungold, Galina’s (a yellow cherry tomato) and one called Matt’s Wild Cherry that I think will be red. It will make for pretty salads no doubt! The other tomatoes that are looking very promising are an Old Ivory Egg and Grandma Mary’s Paste. A few, like the Carbon, Brandywine and German Heirloom Striped, are setting fruit but look a long way from edible – these are supposed to be BIG tomatoes and so far aren’t, so those will be a longer wait.

That’s it for now; I’d almost call it a lull in the garden, if it weren’t for the zucchini that has gone from nothing to rampant in just a few days. I’m glad for the chard to give us at least a little variety in our diets!

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It’s early June and here is what is growing (and edible) in my Colorado garden.

Spinach (just getting from tender salad greens to cooking-quality leaves)

Chard (we just enjoyed our first batch)

Collard Greens (also just had a first batch a few days ago, looking forward to more!)

Radishes (finishing off the last of these)

Pea shoots, peas are on the way

Mesclun greens (assorted including arugula and others)

Speckled heirloom lettuce

Romaine lettuce

Red leaf lettuce

Herbs: chives, 2 kinds of basil, tarragon, 3 kinds of sage, oregano, thyme, 4 kinds of mint, flat-leaf parsley, sorrel. Yanked the last of the cilantro a few days ago.

The red onions are looking great but I’m going to be good and wait for the shoots to dry up and wilt…

On their way (i.e. fruit already visible, just a matter of patience): Currants, gooseberries, celery, peas, zucchini.

That’s it for now… the abundance of greens is certainly testing my culinary creativity, but boy does it feel good to eat them! I will miss them greatly when they are gone, though I have a late crop of Tuscan black kale seeds in the soil in hopes of a mid-summer plethora of dark green goodness. And the chard tends to last really well through the summer.

Happy gardening – and eating – it’s finally feeling a lot like summer!

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